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Goalsandwickets



Joined: 12 May 2012
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 06, 2017 3:58 pm 
Post subject: NEW WEBSITE POST ON GOAL FOOTBALL ANNUAL
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The latest brief guide post on the Goals and Wickets blog website just published, is on another of the popular boys' football annuals of the post war years, this time, the GOAL Football Annual.

The title of the post 'A star parade in more ways than one' refers to another annual, the Football Star Parade which was associated with the GOAL name prior to an annual being published under the title of GOAL.

Although the Football Star Parade was launched in its own right in 1968/69, for the following 2 seasons, the front cover of the annual made reference to GOAL positioning the annual as GOAL's book.

GOAL magazine had been launched in 1968 and with its huge success, it was probably just a matter of time before an annual under the name of the magazine was launched.

GOAL's publishers, IPC magazines obviously made the decision to piggy-back onto an existing annual (Football Star Parade was published by Longacre, an IPC company) as opposed to launching a brand new one.

In 1971/72, the annual took on GOAL's name.

The content of the annual's were a good mix between themed articles on aspects of the game and features on the top clubs and players.

The annuals are a lovely snapshot of their time and a reminder of all the changes going on in the game during the 1970's as well as being a nice reminder of an iconic magazine of the era which merged with SHOOT! in 1974.

In the post, there is the usual summary of the annual's story beginning with the Football Star Parade and finishing with GOAL's 1977 edition. There is then the usual review of each annual year by year.

As always, all page views are much appreciated, as are any comments on here or on the comments section below the post on the website;

http://www.goalsandwickets.co......ll-annual/
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Goalsandwickets



Joined: 12 May 2012
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Location: Oldham, Greater Manchester

PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 2:32 pm 
Post subject: NEW WEBSITE POST ON THE DAILY MAIL FOOTBALL GUIDE
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The latest brief guide post on the Goals and Wickets blog website just published, is on another of the popular pocket football annuals of the post war years, this time, the Daily Mail Football Guide.

There were 25 editions of the guide although for some reason, it changed name for the last 2 editions, to the Weekend Football Guide.

The title of the post refers to the guide's editor throughout its 25 editions, Roy Peskett, who was a well known and respected football writer.

As well as his work for the Daily Mail, Peskett also edited an edition of the Rothmans Football Yearbook, wrote football and cricket books, including a respected history of Crystal Palace F.C. and produced a regular column for the Eagles' match day programme, called Peskett's piece.

On reading through all the guides in order to write the post, Roy Peksett's presence is everywhere, hence the idea of the guide being Peskett's annual piece.

Peskett's comments at the start of each guide make interesting reading as Roy remarked on football's issues of the day as well as the performances of the successful sides.

Perhaps one of the most ironic of these comments, made in the late 1950's, was about a proposal to streamline the Football League into 5 divisions of 20 teams. This idea was rejected, as it was 55 years later. Everything certainly changes as time passes, but much stays the same, it seems.

Although the guide increased and decreased in size and page numbers, there were some pleasing front cover designs (all shown in the post) and a collection of the guides provides a lovely snapshot of football from the 1950's to the mid 1970's, a time of much change in the game.

Consistent with other annuals of this type, the content of the guides was the usual mixture of reports, facts, figures and records of the previous season and history of the game combined with the fixture lists for the upcoming season.

In the post, there is the usual summary of the guide's story starting in 1950/51 followed by the usual review of each guide year by year up to 1974/75.

As always, all page views are much appreciated, as are any comments on here or on the comments section below the post on the website;

http://www.goalsandwickets.co......all-guide/
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Goalsandwickets



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PostPosted: Sat Sep 30, 2017 12:39 pm 
Post subject: Latest blog post on cricket's County Championship
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I've just put the latest post on the Goals and Wickets blog website which is a cricket one, on the County Championship.

I know this is obviously a football site but I also know that there are a few cricket fans who are members.

Stephen Chalke has recently written a history of the competition and as its such a great book, I decided to do a post on it whilst having a look at the competition as it seeks to survive wedged between the worlds of Test cricket and one-day cricket, especially the cash cow of T20.

So the post is part book review and part strategy review although hopefully with not too much business-speak.

As always, thanks for any / all views on the site.

Comments are always welcome, either on the site or on this thread;

http://www.goalsandwickets.co......t-history/
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Pete’s Picture Palace
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 2017 4:40 pm 
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Based on your thread I bought a very good copy of this £20 book from Amazon @ £11.26 including postage, thinking that it might make a decent Xmas present for my big brother.

Well, it would make a good present, but there's one problem. When you start reading, you just can't put it down. I doubt it will get to the packing stage, to be honest. I love it.
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Goalsandwickets



Joined: 12 May 2012
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Location: Oldham, Greater Manchester

PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 2017 5:28 pm 
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Pete’s Picture Palace wrote:
Based on your thread I bought a very good copy of this £20 book from Amazon @ £11.26 including postage, thinking that it might make a decent Xmas present for my big brother.

Well, it would make a good present, but there's one problem. When you start reading, you just can't put it down. I doubt it will get to the packing stage, to be honest. I love it.


Glad you are enjoying it, Pete.

And sorry I missed you last week.
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Goalsandwickets



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PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 6:05 pm 
Post subject: A REVIEW OF TOR! THE STORY OF GERMAN FOOTBALL BY ULI HESSE
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After deciding to improve my knowledge on how football got developed around the World, I started with the much acclaimed history of football's development in Germany, TOR! by Uli Hesse.

Looking forward to the pages ahead, I was surprised but pleased that Uli Hesse opens the book with an anecdote about a coming together of English and German football fans in a pub in North London, I passed every day (although never frequented) for 7 years whilst at school.

Hesse then takes us back to the days when gymnastics was the national sport and football had to fight to get established. He then takes us through the 20th century and tells how football flourished despite difficult historical times and a resistance to professionalism.

Indeed, its an amazing achievement that Germany won the 1954 World Cup with a team of amateurs.

After the launch of the Bundesliga in 1963, many of the big clubs of today rose to the top of the national game.

A key feature of domestic football was the rivalry between Bayern Munich and Borussia Monchengladbach and this relationship is covered in the book.

In the last 20 years, following changes to how football was run including clubs' approach to youth development, much success followed at club level and for the national team.

The book is written in an informative and light hearted way with many interesting anecdotes in addition to the one mentioned above about The Bald Faced Stag Pub in East Finchley above.

All the key people who helped develop German football, including players, coaches and administrators are featured.

In addition to the usual posts on football and cricket memorabilia, I shall be writing a few more of these book reviews as I work my way through some of the other popular histories of football in countries across the world.

Next will be a review of Calcio, the excellent history on Italian football by John Foot.

As always, any comments are most welcome and much appreciated either on the website or below this post;

http://www.goalsandwickets.co......uli-hesse/
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Goalsandwickets



Joined: 12 May 2012
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Location: Oldham, Greater Manchester

PostPosted: Tue Dec 12, 2017 5:35 pm 
Post subject: REVIEW OF CALCIO: A HISTORY OF ITALIAN FOOTBALL BY JOHN FOOT
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Calcio is the 2nd national football history I've now read after deciding to improve my knowledge on how football got developed around the World outside the British Isles.

As noted in the post above, I started with the much acclaimed history of football's development in Germany, TOR! by Uli Hesse and all the searches for similar books on Italian football pointed to Calcio as the one to read.

As with Tor!, Calcio, the name of the sport in Italy, starts with the early days of football in the country back in the 1880's and how the game expanded across the country in all the major towns and cities spawning many of the teams well known today including Juventus, Torino, Genoa, Napoli, Roma, Lazio, Sampdoria, the 2 Milan giants and others.

Author John Foot then splits up the history of Italian football by dividing it into themes, like the referees, the teams, the players, with goalkeepers, defenders, midfielders and strikers all with their own chapters, the managers, politics, scandals, the media and foreigners.

Each theme is covered in its own chapter in a chronological way from the early days of Italian football up to the early 2000's.

The national team's history is also covered, including all the ups with World Cup wins (Marco Tardelli and his reaction to scoring the winner in the 1982 final is the front cover image) and downs with early exits from World Cups and European Championships both being greeted by ferocious reactions from fans and media alike.

Overall, the book relates in some detail not only the history of Italian football but the unique culture of Calcio and how everything merges together in a way that means 'loyalty is total and obsession is the norm'.

The book is written in an informative way with many interesting anecdotes and supporting photographs, taking the length to 547 pages, so providing plenty to read.

All the key people who helped develop Italian football and a few who limited that development are featured.

As always, any comments are most welcome and much appreciated either on the website or below this post;

http://www.goalsandwickets.co......john-foot/
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Goalsandwickets



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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:30 pm 
Post subject: A REVIEW OF MORBO: THE HISTORY OF SPANISH FOOTBALL BY PHIL B
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Morbo is the 3rd national football history I've now read after deciding to improve my knowledge on how football got developed around the World outside the British Isles.

I started with the much acclaimed history of football's development in Germany, TOR! by Uli Hesse and followed it with Calcio: A history of Italian Football (see links to these reviews further up this page). The searches on Spain kept coming back to Morbo as the one to read about the development of football in Spain.

Unlike Tor! and Calcio, Phil Ball's book is written around a concept; in this case, the phenomenon of the title, Morbo, a sort of deep and bitter rivalry between clubs and fans, driven by all the various aspects of society, politics, history, culture and especially the regionalism which is such a significant factor in Spanish life.

But after this introduction, as with Tor! and Calcio, Morbo, continues with the early days of football in the country back in the late 19th century how the game expanded across the country in all the major towns and cities spawning many of the teams well known today including giants Barcelona and Real Madrid but also teams like Athletico Madrid, Athletic Bilbao, Real Saragosa, Valenica, Seville, Real Betis, Celto Vigo, Deportivo La Coruna and Espanyol amongst many others.

Phil Ball adopts a regional approach to telling the story of football's development in Spain and then within that framework provides a chronological narrative about each club's formation and rise with the morbo surrounding each club and its rivals never far away.

The national team's history is also covered in the updated version of the book reflecting the successes of the side in major Championships in the early 2000's set in contrast to the disappointments experienced for decades before this.

The book is written using an anecdotal style and has a particularly interesting chapter on the nicknames of the major clubs and how these came about.

As always, any comments are most welcome and much appreciated either on the website or below this post;

http://www.goalsandwickets.co......phil-ball/
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Goalsandwickets



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Location: Oldham, Greater Manchester

PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 3:44 pm 
Post subject: A PREVIEW OF CITY T20
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The latest blog post on Goals and Wickets is a cricket one looking at the proposed T20 competition to be launched in 2020 by the ECB.

As England's tour down under comes to an end, day by day, the new domestic cricket season gets closer. Although it won't launch until 2020, the elephant in the room as far as the domestic cricket scene is concerned is the new T20 competition being proposed by the ECB.

A T20 competition with City based franchises, replicating the Big Bash in Australia, the IPL in India and similar T20 competitions in Bangladesh and the Caribbean is the ECB's vision.

But what is wrong with what we've already got? Isn't our T20 Blast in pretty good health? Hasn't our domestic T20 competition helped build the sport or at least helped to prevent a number of counties from going under since its launch in 2003? Isn't our domestic scene crowded and difficult enough to understand and follow as it is? Won't another competition just add to the clutter and swamp us in a whole lot more of the 'ding dong' razzamatazz that goes with the modern one-day game?

The ECB believes that a City based competition will attract a new type of cricket fan and that a different approach is the way to build the sport for the future. A new approach. New fans. A revitalised and refreshed sport.

In this new website post, I have a look at some of these questions as the clock ticks down to 2020 and what would be perhaps the most dramatic change to how professional cricket is organised, packaged and marketed to its fans since the modern game began back in the late Victorian age.

As always, any views / comments are much appreciated;

http://www.goalsandwickets.co......mpetition/
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sharrowblade
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 03, 2018 12:34 am 
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Enjoyed the read, and I agree with a lot of points made especially about the over complicated format with regards to the cricket season we have currently.

Before I continue, I like cricket. I really do, I enjoyed playing it and I enjoy watching my lad play it for his local club.

I like the big bash, IPL and our T-20 but I also like the Test Match format.

However, although I'm no expert, here are a few observations:

the county game, the fixtures are all over the place.

I don't like 'central contracts', I can't place England cricketers to their counties anymore, because they rarely play for them.

The new city format will not work if they don't have the recognized internationals playing for them.

Away from T20, there are too many meaningless series against overseas teams.

That's not being disrespectful but who is actually bothered if we beat New Zealand 2-1 in a ODI series.

Nobody will remember it in years to come because ultimately, there's little importance attached to it.

The Ashes and the World Cup are the T20 world Cup are the only competitions that can hold a bigger than normal interest.

If the Big Bash is losing money, then the players are either getting paid too much or somebody is doing a ball of chalk with the money.

There's little cricket on terrestrial TV.

Cricket in India and Australia is huge but it doesn't compete with football like here.

And finally sadly cricket has always had a reputation for being boring.
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Goalsandwickets



Joined: 12 May 2012
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Location: Oldham, Greater Manchester

PostPosted: Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:14 am 
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sharrowblade wrote:
Enjoyed the read, and I agree with a lot of points made especially about the over complicated format with regards to the cricket season we have currently.

Before I continue, I like cricket. I really do, I enjoyed playing it and I enjoy watching my lad play it for his local club.

I like the big bash, IPL and our T-20 but I also like the Test Match format.

However, although I'm no expert, here are a few observations:

the county game, the fixtures are all over the place.

I don't like 'central contracts', I can't place England cricketers to their counties anymore, because they rarely play for them.

The new city format will not work if they don't have the recognized internationals playing for them.

Away from T20, there are too many meaningless series against overseas teams.

That's not being disrespectful but who is actually bothered if we beat New Zealand 2-1 in a ODI series.

Nobody will remember it in years to come because ultimately, there's little importance attached to it.

The Ashes and the World Cup are the T20 world Cup are the only competitions that can hold a bigger than normal interest.

If the Big Bash is losing money, then the players are either getting paid too much or somebody is doing a ball of chalk with the money.

There's little cricket on terrestrial TV.

Cricket in India and Australia is huge but it doesn't compete with football like here.

And finally sadly cricket has always had a reputation for being boring.


Thanks for reading the post, Sharrowblade.

Many would agree with all your points and as a result that's why I believe it's important to simplify things not complicate them more.

Unfortunately, cricket has never been self sufficient and that's why there is so much Test cricket and recently, in my view, too many Ashes series all designed to maximise income.

Elsewhere in the Other Topics section of the cricket side of the site, I have written about the domestic cricket scene and it's often unfathomable schedule which is almost impossible to keep a grip of.

Back to football, whilst there are those who complain about too many games, I've always wondered why such competitions as the Checktrade Trophy still exist.

Often I've heard the argument that competition X is 'the chance for these clubs to get to Wembley' which is a strange justification considering that all League clubs have 2 chances already through the FA Cup and League Cup.

Even in the non league game, I sometimes wonder why there is the Trophy and the Vase. It used to be the Amateur Cup and that was it.

Non league sides have many league fixtures to get through let alone League Cup and also various County Cups too.

At the top of the pro level, I get fed up with them moaning about too many games and too many in short spaces of time.

But TV is often to blame here (as it is in the cricket scheduling) as its demands mean fixtures in the same competition are spread out in order to show different games on different days.

When they moan about too many games, I sometimes find myself asking the radio aloud, 'What are they all doing that they can't play another game; rebuilding their decking outside in the back garden?'.

Of course, up to 1959, clubs played on Christmas Day and then the reverse fixture on Boxing Day.

Can you imagine the reaction if it was suggested that we revert to that schedule?
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Goalsandwickets



Joined: 12 May 2012
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 4:12 pm 
Post subject: INITIAL PROMOTIONAL DUMMY ISSUE OF GOAL MAGAZINE
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Firstly, a big THANK YOU to Goals and Wickets follower, customer and avid football magazine collector, Mark Addicott, who made me aware of the dummy issue of GOAL described below and also supplied the images used in the links.

Prior to Mark's message, I was not even aware that a dummy issue had existed.

GOAL was launched on 16th August, 1968. But prior to the launch, a dummy issue of the magazine had been produced including a sales pitch from publishers Longacre Press designed to sell the new magazine to the trade; the newsagents who would be selling it to all those football mad boys.

I've now updated the brief guide to GOAL magazine on Goals and Wickets to include details of the dummy issue in the story;

http://www.goalsandwickets.co.uk/…/a-brief-guide-to-goal-f…/

I've put a few extra photos of the dummy issue on the Goals and Wickets Facebook page (the most recent post);

https://www.facebook.com/goalsandwickets/

Also, on the Goals and Wickets Twitter account (the most recent tweet);

https://twitter.com/GoalsandWickets

Also, for collectors of GOAL, after a recent listings update, there are now 265 of the 296 editions of the magazine on offer, all but a few of them in at least GOOD condition and many in VERY GOOD condition.

Whilst, unfortunately, these listed editions do not include the dummy issue, which is quite rare (although it does surface on Ebay occasionally), they do include the last one published before the magazine was merged with SHOOT!, #296 which is also reasonably rare and hard to find;

http://stores.ebay.co.uk/GoalsandWickets/Goal-/_i.html

As always, thanks for any / all views.
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Goalsandwickets



Joined: 12 May 2012
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2018 4:24 pm 
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Terribly sad news about the death of Ray Wilkins.

Just posted this on my blog.

Our paths crossed way back in 1972 when Ray was just starting out his football career.

Already, at that time when he was just 15, he was a class act;

http://www.goalsandwickets.co......y-wilkins/
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Pete’s Picture Palace
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2018 4:38 pm 
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Mark, that's a superb and very fitting tribute. Thank you for that.
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Goalsandwickets



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PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2018 5:37 pm 
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Thanks very much, Pete.
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Goalsandwickets



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PostPosted: Thu Apr 26, 2018 2:15 pm 
Post subject: NEW WEBSITE POST ON THE PROGRAMMES OF THE FA CHARITY SHIELD
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The latest brief guide post on the Goals and Wickets blog website just published, is on the programmes issued for the F. A. Charity Shield, since 2002, renamed as the F. A. Community Shield.

There is ongoing debate each season as to the significance of this match and the Shield which goes with it. Usually the winners, both club and fans, regard it as significant; the losers often dismissing the match as a glorified, although prestigious friendly.

However, regardless of the various sides to this debate, the programmes themselves, certainly the ones for the matches played prior to 1974 when the game was moved to become a season opener at Wembley Stadium, are some of the most sought after and valuable issues in all football programme collecting categories.

Some of the match programmes from the mid 1960's going back to 1948, when the game resumed after the 2nd World War, it seems, can reach many hundreds of pounds. Issues for the games prior to 1938 can reach thousands of pounds, in some cases, greater values than their counterparts for F.A Cup Finals.

Regardless of the significance of the matches themselves, as ever, the programmes provide a nice snapshot of their time and certainly from 1974, provide collectors with an area of collecting where a complete set is achievable.

As always, thanks for any views to the post and comments are always welcome on the site or below this post on the thread.

I know that the audience on this forum includes many highly experienced and knowledgeable collectors, so if anyone can add anything to what I've put together, please shout;

http://www.goalsandwickets.co......rogrammes/
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Goalsandwickets



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PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2018 4:28 pm 
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A few thoughts at half time on World Cup 2018.

I think it's been a contrast between off the pitch, where it seems to have all gone brilliantly and on the pitch, where I'm afraid, for me, the obsession with possession has created a way of playing across all the teams which I have found very tedious.

Thankfully, there have been a few great matches, a few exciting ones in round 3 of the group games as the jeopardy starts to kick in and some brilliant individual goals which have raised the spectacle above the endless passing back and forth across the half way line from wing back to wing back.

But whilst commenting on all of the above in this post published today on Goals and Wickets, I also note that the football often improves in the later stages of major championships after cagey starts, so perhaps the best is still to come?

https://www.goalsandwickets.co.uk/football/football-editorial/off-pitch-pitch-half-time-report-world-cup-2018/
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